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p00oo 9 nnlnlnn Thursday, January 3, 2013 l,,, ,.., v***,**v6 ' Tri-Countv News Centr Minn. ................................ J ti%iii ::ti .%i'i 2012: Year in Review By Jean Doran Matua, Editor The year 2013 came in quietly, with an uncharacteristically mild winter, and has ended rather quietly as well, with yet another unfulfilled prediction of the world's end. In-between, it was a wild ride. 2012 was a presidential election year. That shaped much of what hap- pened throughout the United States, not only politically but economically as well. Hope for a better future mixed with economic insecurity to make for an interesting business environment. Political feelings were often pushed to extremes. We made it through the year, most of us, and now look forward to a better 2013 ahead of us. It's fascinating going through our 2012 stories to see just how much happened (and we covered) during the year. I do believe this was a record year for how much news we've covered, and in a much broader geographical area. Here's the start of a look back at the stories and events covered in the Tri-County News during 2012. We hope you enjoy it in the coming weeks! This is, in part, what got us to this point. Wfiat happens from here is yet to be written. JANUARY Dairy farmer Ally Konz was fea- tured in the Jan. 5 Tri-County News in an article reprinted from The Dairy Star. She purchased the dairy herd from retiring farmers Ron and Terre Harff in 2011. There were already reports of fish houses going through lakes in the Jan. 5 Tri-County News. That's a situation that never improved for this ice fishing season. KAHS senior Alex Thurber cel- ebrated his 100th wrestling win at the Paynesville meet Jan. 5. Haynes Hine was champion and Samuel Ehlinger reserve cham- pion in the Jan. 6 Geography Bee at KAHS. Fourteen seventh- and eighth-graders competed in the annual event. Jan. 6 was the annual Kimball Elementary fifth- and sixth-grade fish fry fundraiser at Generations Ballroom; the funds raised went to their field trips. Jan. 7, a chilly Saturday morn- ing, saw the Kingston Apostolic Lutheran Church burned down as a combined firefighter training exer- cise. The 99-year-old building had been replaced by a modern building on another site, and was so far out of code that it was not financially feasible to save or restore it. A small crowd gathered to watch for hours as the building was burned follow- ing a brief prayer service by pas- tor Orval Wirkkala. The Jan. 12 TCN featured a number of emotional memories of the old church build- ing. It was clear, though, that the church was the people who went on; the "church" did not reside in the obsolete building. Jan. 7 was the third annual Woodchuck Bocci Ball Tournament at the Watkins Skating Rink. Seniors Erin Dingmann and Mitchell Hurrle were named Triple A (Academics, Arts and Athletics) Award by the Minnesota State High School League, at Kimball Area High School. The award comes with a four-year $1,000 scholarship. St. "John's Prep senior Claire Arnold, daughter of John and Mar- garet Arnold of Kimball, was awarded the Triple A Award at St. John's Prep. Jan. 10 was the first CMC Knowl- edge Bowl meet of the year, hosted at Kimball; both EV-W varsity and junior varsity teams took second; Kimball came in third. Jan. 12 the Kimball National Honor Society held their 4th annual spaghetti dinner fundraiser. EV-W hosted a Knowledge Bowl meet Jan. 14 with 62 teams partici- pating; EV-W took fifth place. Kimball Cub Scouts spent six hours at Stearns Boy Scout Camp in Fair Haven as part of the "Polar Cubs" program there. Jan. 14 Lake Union Covenant Church held its annual Wild Game Dinner. Jan. 15 a fundraiser benefit was held for Tori Unterberger, the 3-year- old daughter of Tracy Unterberger and granddaughter of Tom and Doreen Unterberger. The breakfast benefit at the Wat-Kim-Valley VFW raised money to help Tori and her family deal with her Angelman Syn- drome, a neurogenetic disorder. Jan. 17 a Red Cross blood drive was held at St. Anne's Church in Kimball. Fifty units were collected. LuAnn Marschel reached the eight- gallon donation level. A harpist performed at the Kim- ball Public Library Jan. 21, spon- sored by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural HeritageFund. Kimball Cub Scouts held their annual Derby Car Race Jan. 21 at Kimball Elementary School. Riley Matthiesen was grand champion; nine boys went on to the district race April 14 in Winsted; Matthie- sen took second there. Several local piano students par- ticipated in a Jan. 22 recital at Lam- son Evangelical Free Church in Das- sel. Steve Maus presented a check for $1,380 Jan. 24 to the Kimball Elementary P.I.E. (Parents In Edu- cation) from the Nov. 9 "Drive for the Kids" fundraiser sponsored by Chrysler. At the annual Minnesota News- paper Convention, the Tri-County News came home with five awards: Sue Hughes got both first and sec- ond place for self-promotion ads; Danielle Brower won second in "best news photo;" our website won again in our category of newspa- pers; and Jean Matua won first place for a full-page ad that explained the upcoming school levy. KAHS performed "Butterfly" in the section one-act play tournament in Howard Lake Jan. 28. Kimball ranked fourth in the tournament. Kimball Area High School hosted the District Spelling Bee Jan. 31. Zach Streit won from among 16 con- testants in grades 6-8. The Regional Bee was set for Feb. 15. 2012/To page 12 Pettier "Slices of Life" Optimism on steroids In previous columns, I defined parenthood as an infinite act of optimism. You enter the job with open arms and an open heart, trusting the child you've been entrusted with will learn, grow and love under your humble tute- lage. Loving one child is optimis- tic-two, doubly so. Imagine taking responsibility for 20, or maybe 25. I define that as optimism on steroids. As a parent, you get to keep the same kids season after sea- son. As soon as you've known your own for about a minute and a half, they start to grow on you and you wouldn't dream of swapping them out for another set. In fact, the thought is painful; your heart can't even contemplate the idea. Now, imagine swapping out your 20 for a new group each year. Just about the time you get to know the ones in your care, they up and move on to bigger and bet- ter things, leaving you to start all over with a couple dozen little newbie strangers. I call that crazy optimism on steroids. Or, to use another term: the work of a teacher. Teaching is near the top of the list of the most noble of profes- sions, yet often one we take for granted. The majority of us serui our children offeach morningwith homework in their backpacks and Froot Loops on their breaths and don't give it a second thought. We rest assured our kids will learn the multiplication facts, their spell- ing list for the week and the differ- ence between a liquid and a solid. They'll eat lunch in the cafeteria, sing in the music room and play outside during recess. Through it all, they will be safe, because they are with their teacher. Most teachers go into the pro- fession because they love kids and want to educate them. Now, however, we ask a whole lot more. We expect them to teach to state and federal standards, when kids in their classroom may come to school hungry, or without a good night's sleep. We expect them to utilize technology and the lat- est in teaching techniques, when what some of their students need most is a hug. They are required to pacify demanding helicopter par- ents and make up for the absence of those too busy to come to school conferences. On top of everything else we ask them to keep our kids safe-from things too evil to men- tion in the classroom. Most teachers chose the profes- sion knowing they'd need to keep kids safe. Safe from skinned knees during recess and sunburned shoulders during the spring field trip. They expected to lead discus- sions about Harriet Tubman and Christopher Columbus, not where to hide if a bad stranger enters the school. They expected to be famiP iar with the pull of a child's arms around their neck, not the weight of a lanyard With keys equipping them for lockdown at a moment's notice. When I was a kid, the scariest thing at school was the tornado drill-and it was just a drill. What we are currently experiencing is no longer a drill. My mom taught first grade and forged in me a great respect for teachers. However, in all honesty (and with a bit of embarrassment) when my daughter, now a college junior, first expressed an interest in teaching, I hesitated. I wasn't sure I wanted her to go into the most noble of professions-sim- ply because of the sacrifices and risks and overwhelming expecta- tions placed on teachers today. I fear what we are asking is becom- ing too much. Like most 18-year-olds, she lis- tened to me politely, and then went on to follow her own plans. People go into teaching because they are passionate about what they do; not based on advice from their moth- ers. It is a calling. You can't change that. I could no more tell my daugh- ter not to teach than she could tell me not to write. So we are back to optimism on steroids. Said another way, teach- ing is a headfirst dive into the deep end of idealism with an enduring and intrinsic trust in one's own buoyancy. Teachers have become lifeguards in the true sense of the word. As far as I'm concerned, they've been in the deep end long enough. It's time we throw them a life preserver, drape a warm dry towel over their shoulders and show them, by our actions, how important they are-not only to our children, but to all of us. Follow Slices of Life on Face- book and hit Like (please). Jilt Pertler is an award-winning syn- dicated columnist, playwright and author of "The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication" E-mail her at pertmn@qwest.net; or visit her website at http://marketing-by- design.home.mchsi.com/. DEADLINE: 2_p.m__z Monday___ss wwwi00c-0-00ewws. M N POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Tri-County News, P.O. Box 220, Kimball MN 55353. The Tri-County News (USPS 639- 180) is entered at the Post Office, Kimball, Minnesota 55353, as Periodi- cals. It is published Thursdays by the Tri-County News, Inc., RO. Box 220, Kimball MN 55353, Stearns County. LOCATION: Our office is at 70 Main Street South in downtown Kim- ball. Weekday office hours are Monday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesday throush Friday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Our telephone and fax nL#n- bet is (320) 398-5000 or (320) 453-6397. E-mail can be addressed to news@ tr/countynews.MN. Our Web site is tricountynews.NiN. We also have a drop site at Ertt Hardware Hank in downtown Walins. A satellite office is now open at 378 N State Street, downtown Eden Valley, open 10-6 Mon.-Ffi. and 9-12 Sat. DEADLINE: 2 p.m. Monday. RATES: Subscription rates are 536/year (526 for age 62 and older) in Minnesota; $46/year (536 for seniors) elsewhere in the U.S. Single copy price is one dollar. STAFF: Jean Doran Matua, Editor and Publisher Sue Hughes: Creative Designer Maxine Doran: Admin. Associate Marguerite Laabs: Photographer Stephanie Johnson: Office Admin. Pat Garry: Staff Writer The staff of the Tri-County News recognizes that it has a responsibili- ty to report the news accurately and fairly, and that it is accountable to the pubiic. PLease contact our office if you feel we've fallen short of that objective. LETrERS: The Tri-County News wel- comes Letters promoting the exchange of ideas and opinions. To be considered for publication, Letters should address a topic of current or general interest. Private thanks, political self-promotion, libelous Letters, or Letters denigrating character or reputation will not be pub- Lished. ALL Letters must bear the writer's signature, address and telephone num- ber. We reserve the right to edit for clarity and readability. LEGAL PUBLICATION: The Tri-Coun- ty News is the publication of record for the Cities of Eden Valley, Kimball, and Welkins; Independent School District #-/39 (Kimball) and Independent School District #463 (Eden VaLtey-Watkins); CLearwater River Watershed District, Steams County, and the Townships of Fair Haven, Forest Prairie, Kingston, Luxemburg, and Maine Prairie. RECYCLING: The Tri-County News is printed with soy inks on recycled paper whenever possible. We en- courage recyciing. COPYRIGHT: ALL content herein is the property of the Tri-County News and is protected by U.S. copyright Law; content may not be reproduced without our written prior consent. We are proud to be a member of: Minnesota Newspaper Assoc. KimbaLi Area Chamber Kimball Area Historical Society Stearns County Press Assoc. MNA Peer-iuded Awards: Ad Design winner: 2011, 2012 Best Website: 2010, 2011, 2012 Best Self-Promotion Ad: 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Best Use of Color lAd): 2010 Best News Photo: 2010, 2011, 2012 Best Advertisement: 2008, 2011 Best Portrait/Personality Photo: 2008 Advertising Excellence: 2004, 2007 Best Information Graphic: 2007 Best CLassified Ads: 2006 Best Local News Story: 2000 2013, Tri-County News " ll " s " TCN Office Hours (Kimball Mondays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. EVWN Office Hours Eden Valley): Mon.-Fri., 10 a.rn.-6 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon for drop-offs and pick-ups (Available by appointment - just call!) NOW you can also reach us at 453-NEWS (-6397) p00oo 9 nnlnlnn Thursday, January 3, 2013 l,,, ,.., v***,**v6 ' Tri-Countv News Centr Minn. ................................ J ti%iii ::ti .%i'i 2012: Year in Review By Jean Doran Matua, Editor The year 2013 came in quietly, with an uncharacteristically mild winter, and has ended rather quietly as well, with yet another unfulfilled prediction of the world's end. In-between, it was a wild ride. 2012 was a presidential election year. That shaped much of what hap- pened throughout the United States, not only politically but economically as well. Hope for a better future mixed with economic insecurity to make for an interesting business environment. Political feelings were often pushed to extremes. We made it through the year, most of us, and now look forward to a better 2013 ahead of us. It's fascinating going through our 2012 stories to see just how much happened (and we covered) during the year. I do believe this was a record year for how much news we've covered, and in a much broader geographical area. Here's the start of a look back at the stories and events covered in the Tri-County News during 2012. We hope you enjoy it in the coming weeks! This is, in part, what got us to this point. Wfiat happens from here is yet to be written. JANUARY Dairy farmer Ally Konz was fea- tured in the Jan. 5 Tri-County News in an article reprinted from The Dairy Star. She purchased the dairy herd from retiring farmers Ron and Terre Harff in 2011. There were already reports of fish houses going through lakes in the Jan. 5 Tri-County News. That's a situation that never improved for this ice fishing season. KAHS senior Alex Thurber cel- ebrated his 100th wrestling win at the Paynesville meet Jan. 5. Haynes Hine was champion and Samuel Ehlinger reserve cham- pion in the Jan. 6 Geography Bee at KAHS. Fourteen seventh- and eighth-graders competed in the annual event. Jan. 6 was the annual Kimball Elementary fifth- and sixth-grade fish fry fundraiser at Generations Ballroom; the funds raised went to their field trips. Jan. 7, a chilly Saturday morn- ing, saw the Kingston Apostolic Lutheran Church burned down as a combined firefighter training exer- cise. The 99-year-old building had been replaced by a modern building on another site, and was so far out of code that it was not financially feasible to save or restore it. A small crowd gathered to watch for hours as the building was burned follow- ing a brief prayer service by pas- tor Orval Wirkkala. The Jan. 12 TCN featured a number of emotional memories of the old church build- ing. It was clear, though, that the church was the people who went on; the "church" did not reside in the obsolete building. Jan. 7 was the third annual Woodchuck Bocci Ball Tournament at the Watkins Skating Rink. Seniors Erin Dingmann and Mitchell Hurrle were named Triple A (Academics, Arts and Athletics) Award by the Minnesota State High School League, at Kimball Area High School. The award comes with a four-year $1,000 scholarship. St. "John's Prep senior Claire Arnold, daughter of John and Mar- garet Arnold of Kimball, was awarded the Triple A Award at St. John's Prep. Jan. 10 was the first CMC Knowl- edge Bowl meet of the year, hosted at Kimball; both EV-W varsity and junior varsity teams took second; Kimball came in third. Jan. 12 the Kimball National Honor Society held their 4th annual spaghetti dinner fundraiser. EV-W hosted a Knowledge Bowl meet Jan. 14 with 62 teams partici- pating; EV-W took fifth place. Kimball Cub Scouts spent six hours at Stearns Boy Scout Camp in Fair Haven as part of the "Polar Cubs" program there. Jan. 14 Lake Union Covenant Church held its annual Wild Game Dinner. Jan. 15 a fundraiser benefit was held for Tori Unterberger, the 3-year- old daughter of Tracy Unterberger and granddaughter of Tom and Doreen Unterberger. The breakfast benefit at the Wat-Kim-Valley VFW raised money to help Tori and her family deal with her Angelman Syn- drome, a neurogenetic disorder. Jan. 17 a Red Cross blood drive was held at St. Anne's Church in Kimball. Fifty units were collected. LuAnn Marschel reached the eight- gallon donation level. A harpist performed at the Kim- ball Public Library Jan. 21, spon- sored by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural HeritageFund. Kimball Cub Scouts held their annual Derby Car Race Jan. 21 at Kimball Elementary School. Riley Matthiesen was grand champion; nine boys went on to the district race April 14 in Winsted; Matthie- sen took second there. Several local piano students par- ticipated in a Jan. 22 recital at Lam- son Evangelical Free Church in Das- sel. Steve Maus presented a check for $1,380 Jan. 24 to the Kimball Elementary P.I.E. (Parents In Edu- cation) from the Nov. 9 "Drive for the Kids" fundraiser sponsored by Chrysler. At the annual Minnesota News- paper Convention, the Tri-County News came home with five awards: Sue Hughes got both first and sec- ond place for self-promotion ads; Danielle Brower won second in "best news photo;" our website won again in our category of newspa- pers; and Jean Matua won first place for a full-page ad that explained the upcoming school levy. KAHS performed "Butterfly" in the section one-act play tournament in Howard Lake Jan. 28. Kimball ranked fourth in the tournament. Kimball Area High School hosted the District Spelling Bee Jan. 31. Zach Streit won from among 16 con- testants in grades 6-8. The Regional Bee was set for Feb. 15. 2012/To page 12 Pettier "Slices of Life" Optimism on steroids In previous columns, I defined parenthood as an infinite act of optimism. You enter the job with open arms and an open heart, trusting the child you've been entrusted with will learn, grow and love under your humble tute- lage. Loving one child is optimis- tic-two, doubly so. Imagine taking responsibility for 20, or maybe 25. I define that as optimism on steroids. As a parent, you get to keep the same kids season after sea- son. As soon as you've known your own for about a minute and a half, they start to grow on you and you wouldn't dream of swapping them out for another set. In fact, the thought is painful; your heart can't even contemplate the idea. Now, imagine swapping out your 20 for a new group each year. Just about the time you get to know the ones in your care, they up and move on to bigger and bet- ter things, leaving you to start all over with a couple dozen little newbie strangers. I call that crazy optimism on steroids. Or, to use another term: the work of a teacher. Teaching is near the top of the list of the most noble of profes- sions, yet often one we take for granted. The majority of us serui our children offeach morningwith homework in their backpacks and Froot Loops on their breaths and don't give it a second thought. We rest assured our kids will learn the multiplication facts, their spell- ing list for the week and the differ- ence between a liquid and a solid. They'll eat lunch in the cafeteria, sing in the music room and play outside during recess. Through it all, they will be safe, because they are with their teacher. Most teachers go into the pro- fession because they love kids and want to educate them. Now, however, we ask a whole lot more. We expect them to teach to state and federal standards, when kids in their classroom may come to school hungry, or without a good night's sleep. We expect them to utilize technology and the lat- est in teaching techniques, when what some of their students need most is a hug. They are required to pacify demanding helicopter par- ents and make up for the absence of those too busy to come to school conferences. On top of everything else we ask them to keep our kids safe-from things too evil to men- tion in the classroom. Most teachers chose the profes- sion knowing they'd need to keep kids safe. Safe from skinned knees during recess and sunburned shoulders during the spring field trip. They expected to lead discus- sions about Harriet Tubman and Christopher Columbus, not where to hide if a bad stranger enters the school. They expected to be famiP iar with the pull of a child's arms around their neck, not the weight of a lanyard With keys equipping them for lockdown at a moment's notice. When I was a kid, the scariest thing at school was the tornado drill-and it was just a drill. What we are currently experiencing is no longer a drill. My mom taught first grade and forged in me a great respect for teachers. However, in all honesty (and with a bit of embarrassment) when my daughter, now a college junior, first expressed an interest in teaching, I hesitated. I wasn't sure I wanted her to go into the most noble of professions-sim- ply because of the sacrifices and risks and overwhelming expecta- tions placed on teachers today. I fear what we are asking is becom- ing too much. Like most 18-year-olds, she lis- tened to me politely, and then went on to follow her own plans. People go into teaching because they are passionate about what they do; not based on advice from their moth- ers. It is a calling. You can't change that. I could no more tell my daugh- ter not to teach than she could tell me not to write. So we are back to optimism on steroids. Said another way, teach- ing is a headfirst dive into the deep end of idealism with an enduring and intrinsic trust in one's own buoyancy. Teachers have become lifeguards in the true sense of the word. As far as I'm concerned, they've been in the deep end long enough. It's time we throw them a life preserver, drape a warm dry towel over their shoulders and show them, by our actions, how important they are-not only to our children, but to all of us. Follow Slices of Life on Face- book and hit Like (please). Jilt Pertler is an award-winning syn- dicated columnist, playwright and author of "The Do-It-Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication" E-mail her at pertmn@qwest.net; or visit her website at http://marketing-by- design.home.mchsi.com/. DEADLINE: 2_p.m__z Monday___ss wwwi00c-0-00ewws. M N POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Tri-County News, P.O. Box 220, Kimball MN 55353. The Tri-County News (USPS 639- 180) is entered at the Post Office, Kimball, Minnesota 55353, as Periodi- cals. It is published Thursdays by the Tri-County News, Inc., RO. Box 220, Kimball MN 55353, Stearns County. LOCATION: Our office is at 70 Main Street South in downtown Kim- ball. Weekday office hours are Monday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesday throush Friday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Our telephone and fax nL#n- bet is (320) 398-5000 or (320) 453-6397. E-mail can be addressed to news@ tr/countynews.MN. Our Web site is tricountynews.NiN. We also have a drop site at Ertt Hardware Hank in downtown Walins. A satellite office is now open at 378 N State Street, downtown Eden Valley, open 10-6 Mon.-Ffi. and 9-12 Sat. DEADLINE: 2 p.m. Monday. RATES: Subscription rates are 536/year (526 for age 62 and older) in Minnesota; $46/year (536 for seniors) elsewhere in the U.S. Single copy price is one dollar. STAFF: Jean Doran Matua, Editor and Publisher Sue Hughes: Creative Designer Maxine Doran: Admin. Associate Marguerite Laabs: Photographer Stephanie Johnson: Office Admin. Pat Garry: Staff Writer The staff of the Tri-County News recognizes that it has a responsibili- ty to report the news accurately and fairly, and that it is accountable to the pubiic. PLease contact our office if you feel we've fallen short of that objective. LETrERS: The Tri-County News wel- comes Letters promoting the exchange of ideas and opinions. To be considered for publication, Letters should address a topic of current or general interest. Private thanks, political self-promotion, libelous Letters, or Letters denigrating character or reputation will not be pub- Lished. ALL Letters must bear the writer's signature, address and telephone num- ber. We reserve the right to edit for clarity and readability. LEGAL PUBLICATION: The Tri-Coun- ty News is the publication of record for the Cities of Eden Valley, Kimball, and Welkins; Independent School District #-/39 (Kimball) and Independent School District #463 (Eden VaLtey-Watkins); CLearwater River Watershed District, Steams County, and the Townships of Fair Haven, Forest Prairie, Kingston, Luxemburg, and Maine Prairie. RECYCLING: The Tri-County News is printed with soy inks on recycled paper whenever possible. We en- courage recyciing. COPYRIGHT: ALL content herein is the property of the Tri-County News and is protected by U.S. copyright Law; content may not be reproduced without our written prior consent. We are proud to be a member of: Minnesota Newspaper Assoc. KimbaLi Area Chamber Kimball Area Historical Society Stearns County Press Assoc. MNA Peer-iuded Awards: Ad Design winner: 2011, 2012 Best Website: 2010, 2011, 2012 Best Self-Promotion Ad: 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Best Use of Color lAd): 2010 Best News Photo: 2010, 2011, 2012 Best Advertisement: 2008, 2011 Best Portrait/Personality Photo: 2008 Advertising Excellence: 2004, 2007 Best Information Graphic: 2007 Best CLassified Ads: 2006 Best Local News Story: 2000 2013, Tri-County News " ll " s " TCN Office Hours (Kimball Mondays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. EVWN Office Hours Eden Valley): Mon.-Fri., 10 a.rn.-6 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon for drop-offs and pick-ups (Available by appointment - just call!) NOW you can also reach us at 453-NEWS (-6397)