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Pa00e 6 Melvin 'Mel' Kackman, 84 Melvin Kackman died peace- fully at Hilltop Care Center in Watkins Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012. He was 84. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31, at St. John's Lutheran Church in Kim- ball. Visitation is one hour prior to the service. Burial will be held pri- vately at Fort Snelling Cemetery. Melvin F. Kackman was born Aug. 22, 1928, to Otto and Ella Kackman on a farm near Lidger- wood, N.D. After graduating from high school, he served in the U.S. Army in Korea from 1946-1948. He married Betty Lou Grobe Nov. 13, 1950. Mel worked at Ford Motor Company for 30 years, retiring in 1984. He was an active member of the United Auto Workers (UAW) and served as financial secre- tary for many years. He also was a member of the South St. Paul VFW and the Eden Valley Ameri- can Legion. Mel enjoyed fishing, hunting, gardening, sports, and playing cards. His favorite times were spent with his family. Mel and Betty lived 50 years in South St. Paul where he was an active member of Concordia Lutheran Church. Mel and Betty later settled in Eden Valley. Mel enjoyed many years on Eden Lake. Mel was preceded in death by his parents; brother Gordon Kack- man; sisters Loretta Kackman, Dorothy Diekow, and Delores Elznic; and granddaughter Sara Burgwald. He is survived by his wife Betty; children Jayne Conrad of Eden Valley, Debra (and Roger) Burg- wald of Cottage Grove, Nancy Lindell of Richmond, Thomas (and Elizabeth) Kackman of Burnsville, Barbara (and Gary) Anderson of Amelia Island, Fla., and Linda (and Scott) Reff of Lino Lakes; 13 grandchildren and seven great- grandchildren; sisters Grace Kack- man and Eleanor Olson; brother- in-law Norm (and Carol) Grobe; and many nieces and nephews. His ready handshake and quick wit will be missed by many. His family wishes to thank Hill- top Care Center for their respect- ful' and kind care of Mel during his stay there. Arrangements were by Williams Dingmann Family Funeral Home in Eden Valley. 'All Things Fresh and New' brunch Jan. 10 Ladies are you looking for a new start this January? Then start with the "All Things Fresh and New" brunch held at Reichel's Event Center in Annandale at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 10. Annandale's new store, Retro Market will be featured. Chanda Knoof, owner and chef will tell us about her tasty and fun offerings. Your stress will also slip away as you listen to the melodies of the highly accomplished flutist and speaker Holly Berry of Minneap- olis, whose theme is "Playing for Keeps!" Don't forget to invite your friends and make reservations. Call Sheree before 8 p.m. at (320) 963-6625, or e-mail bruce.skr.74@ charter.net. This event is spon- sored by Stonecroft Ministries. fDingmann00 Funeral Ca re ,/ Burial and Cremation Services View obituaries, guestbooks and videos on-line [ ! Kimball (320) 398-5055 [ Kimball Area . Emergency " r#:d She St. Anne's Church in Kimball .... Io:10:45a:m:Tues./Thu;s. ..... Also open 2nd Monday of the month: 5:30-6:30 p.m. tel. (320) 398-2211 For after-hours emergencies, call one of the area churches. Civil War digest: This week 150 years ago Church .40bit. Thursday, January 3, 2013 Centr Minn. at Fort Lawrence, Beaver Station, Mo., as part of the raid by Confeder- ate Brigadier General John S. Mar- maduke. Major Highlights for the Week Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1862 BATTLE OF STONE'S RIVER, TENN., BEGINS The Confederates at Murfrees- boro, Tenn. waited for an assault from Major General William S. Rosecrans Federal army hut it did not come on the 30th. General Brax- ton Bragg took the initiative imme- diately after dawn when Lieutenant General William J. Hardee's Con- federate corps opened fire on the Federal's right flank. Rosecrans's army held for several assaults on their northern flank, but were pushed back to the Murfreesboro- Nashville Pike and pinned with their backs against Stone's River. Assaults continued until late after- noon and the armies rested as the December evening fell early upon the battlefield. In Washington, President Abra- ham Lincoln met with his Cabinet to make final adjustments to the Emancipation Proclamation. Lin- coln also approved an act admit- ting West Virginia into the Union as the 35th state and signed an agree- ment with a promoter for a colony of free Negroes on Ile a Vache, Haiti. Thursday, Jan. 1, 1863 EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION "I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free." Thus read the final Eman- cipation Proclamation of Jan. 1, putting into effect President Abra- ham Lincoln's preliminary procla- mation of Sept. 22, 1862. No slaves were freed specifically at that moment as the proclamation spec- ified that it applied to "the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States." How- ever, it paved the way for the sub- sequent passage of the Thirteenth Amendment which was passed on Jan. 31, 1865, and ratified nearly a year later. At Murfreesboro, Tenn., it was a quiet day as both armies rested, tended to their wounded ar!d cele- brated New Year's Day. Friday, Jan. 2, 1863 BATTLE OF STONE'S RIVER CONTINUES Late in the afternoon, General Braxton Bragg ordered Major Gen- eral John C. Breckinridge's Con- federates to attack Colonel Samuel Beatty's Federal division which was on a hill on the river's east bank. Breckinridge initially protested but eventually relented to the attack. The attack was initially success- ful until the 45-guns of Captain John Mendenhall's Federal artil- lery opened up on the Confederates and causing more than 1,800 Con- federate casualties in the course of one hour, including many of the 1st Kentucky Brigade, which received it's perpetual nickname as the : Amenities to meet you r needs: .,.::. v:: . . Ar .- 3 meals per day& snacks as,o,JlqLae a're . Scheduled exercise and activities Church activities, including mass 3 timeslmo. -  Housekeeplngllaund servces Medication services with LPN/RN services available 24 hours per day For m House of Kimball Assisted Living at its Finest 50 A British steamer was seized off Mobile, Ala., by the blockaders, one of the numerous captures by the day-in, day-out blockade of the Confederate coast. Confederates captured a North- ern riverboat, Jacob Musselman, MINNESOTA near Memphis. -----i Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of Dec. 31, 1862-Jan. 6, 1861 CIVIL WAR 1.865 1863 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infan- "Orphan Brigade" after Breckin- try- In camp near Falmouth, Va. ridge rode through its ranks crying 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infan- out, "My poor Orphans! My poor orphans." Bragg's Confederates lost try - On guard duty at Gallatin, 1,294 killed, 7,945 wounded and Tenn., until Jan. 29, 1863. 3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infan- 2,500 missing for a combined loss of try - On duty at Fort Snelling, 11,739 from approximately 35,000 engaged. Rosecrans's Federals lost Minn., until Jan. 16, 1863. 4th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- 1,677 killed, 7,543 wounded and 3,686 missing for a loss of12,906 out try - Duty at White's Station and of 41,400 engaged. Memphis, Tenn., until Feb. 24, 1863. 5th Minnesota Volunteer Salutes, celebrations and meet- ings followed the Emancipation Infantry - Companies B, C and Proclamation in many Northern D remained in Minnesota and cities. In Richmond, the New Year Dakota Territory on garrison duty. The remaining companies were on greeted people with high prices and Major General Ulysses Grant's Cen- more belt tightening. Saturday, Jan. 3, 1863 tral Mississippi Campaign until The Federals pushed two bri: January1863. 6th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- gades forward at Murfreesboro in try- On garrison duty at Fort Snel- a mild attack on Southern lines at Stone's River. During the night, ling, Glencoe, Forest City and General Braxton Bragg's Confeder- Kingston until February 1863. 7th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- ate Army of the Tennessee, despite try - On garrison duty in Mankato apparent victory in the first stages and other points in Minnesota until of the battle, withdrew from Mur- freesboro towards Tullahoma, June 1863. Tenn. 8th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- Confederates failed in an attack try - On frontier duty at various on Moorefield, W.V.; and there was points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princ- skirmishing at Burnsvitle, Miss.; eton, Monticello, Kingston, Manan- Somerville and Cox's Hill, Tenn. nah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Sunday, Jan. 4, 1863 Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexan- dria and Fort Abercrombie until On the Mississippi River, Major May 1864. General John A. McClernand, with 9th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- the Federal Army of the Missis- try - On garrison duty in various sippi, began an unauthorized move frontier Minnesota communities up the Arkansas River with 30,000 until June 1863. troops and 50 transports and gun- boats towards Fort Hindman. 10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry - Regiment on detached Skirmishing occurred at Mur- service for garrison duty at vari- freesboro and on the Manches- ter Pike as General Braxton Bragg ous outposts in frontier Minnesota continued his withdrawal to Tulla- until June 1863. homa, Tenn. 1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry Monday, Jan. 5, 1863 "Mounted Rangers" - Organized at Federal troops entered Mur- St. Cloud, St. Peter and Fort Snel- freesboro, although fighting on a ling for frontier duty against Indi- minor scale continued at Lytle's ansuntilJune 1863. Creek, on the Manchester Pike, and Brackett's Battalion of Minne- on the Shelbyville Pike, Tenn. Presi- sota Cavalry- On expedition at Fort dent Lincoln tendered the thanks of Heiman, Tenn. 1st Minnesota Light Artillery the country to Major General Wil- Battery- On Major General Ulysses liam Rosecrans for his victory at Grant's Central Mississippi Cam- Stone's River. In Richmond, Confederate Pres- paign near Vicksburg, Miss., until ident Jefferson Davis told a crowd January 1863. 2nd Independent Battery, Min- that the Confederacy was the last nesota Light Artillery - On duty hope "for the perpetuation of that at Nashville, Tenn., until Dec. 26, system of government which our 1862. forefathers founded- the asylum of the oppressed and the home of true 2nd United States Sharpshoot- representative liberty." ers, Company A - In camp at Fal- Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1863 mouth, Va. It was a day of light fighting along Linn Creek in Missouri; and St. John's Prep hosts Discovery Day Families interested in learn- lunch at approximately 12:30. For ing about the innovative curric- the Upper School (for incoming ulum, and other opportunities at grades 9-12), Discovery Day guests St. John's Prep, are encouraged to are invited to spend the entire day attend the upcoming Discovery in classes. Day on Friday, Jan. 11. Students Registration for Discovery Day currently in grades 5-11 are wel- is required. Call us today at 320- come to attend classes, meet the 363-3321. Due to limited space, teachers and students, and expe- we encourage interested families rience what it's like to be a part of to apply now for the 2013-14 aca- the Saint John's Prep community, demic year. Parents are also invited to attend Founded in 1857, St. John's Prep information session with admin- is a Catholic/Benedictine, co-ed, istrators of the school, private day and boarding school, Guest students arrive before 8 providing students of all faiths in am and are matched with a "host" grades 6-12, with a college-prepa- student for the day. The Mid- ratorycurriculum. For moreinfor- die School (for incoming grades marion, visit www.sjprep.net, or 6-8) Discovery Day ends after ca11(320)363-3321. Pa00e 6 Melvin 'Mel' Kackman, 84 Melvin Kackman died peace- fully at Hilltop Care Center in Watkins Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012. He was 84. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31, at St. John's Lutheran Church in Kim- ball. Visitation is one hour prior to the service. Burial will be held pri- vately at Fort Snelling Cemetery. Melvin F. Kackman was born Aug. 22, 1928, to Otto and Ella Kackman on a farm near Lidger- wood, N.D. After graduating from high school, he served in the U.S. Army in Korea from 1946-1948. He married Betty Lou Grobe Nov. 13, 1950. Mel worked at Ford Motor Company for 30 years, retiring in 1984. He was an active member of the United Auto Workers (UAW) and served as financial secre- tary for many years. He also was a member of the South St. Paul VFW and the Eden Valley Ameri- can Legion. Mel enjoyed fishing, hunting, gardening, sports, and playing cards. His favorite times were spent with his family. Mel and Betty lived 50 years in South St. Paul where he was an active member of Concordia Lutheran Church. Mel and Betty later settled in Eden Valley. Mel enjoyed many years on Eden Lake. Mel was preceded in death by his parents; brother Gordon Kack- man; sisters Loretta Kackman, Dorothy Diekow, and Delores Elznic; and granddaughter Sara Burgwald. He is survived by his wife Betty; children Jayne Conrad of Eden Valley, Debra (and Roger) Burg- wald of Cottage Grove, Nancy Lindell of Richmond, Thomas (and Elizabeth) Kackman of Burnsville, Barbara (and Gary) Anderson of Amelia Island, Fla., and Linda (and Scott) Reff of Lino Lakes; 13 grandchildren and seven great- grandchildren; sisters Grace Kack- man and Eleanor Olson; brother- in-law Norm (and Carol) Grobe; and many nieces and nephews. His ready handshake and quick wit will be missed by many. His family wishes to thank Hill- top Care Center for their respect- ful' and kind care of Mel during his stay there. Arrangements were by Williams Dingmann Family Funeral Home in Eden Valley. 'All Things Fresh and New' brunch Jan. 10 Ladies are you looking for a new start this January? Then start with the "All Things Fresh and New" brunch held at Reichel's Event Center in Annandale at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 10. Annandale's new store, Retro Market will be featured. Chanda Knoof, owner and chef will tell us about her tasty and fun offerings. Your stress will also slip away as you listen to the melodies of the highly accomplished flutist and speaker Holly Berry of Minneap- olis, whose theme is "Playing for Keeps!" Don't forget to invite your friends and make reservations. Call Sheree before 8 p.m. at (320) 963-6625, or e-mail bruce.skr.74@ charter.net. This event is spon- sored by Stonecroft Ministries. fDingmann00 Funeral Ca re ,/ Burial and Cremation Services View obituaries, guestbooks and videos on-line [ ! Kimball (320) 398-5055 [ Kimball Area . Emergency " r#:d She St. Anne's Church in Kimball .... Io:10:45a:m:Tues./Thu;s. ..... Also open 2nd Monday of the month: 5:30-6:30 p.m. tel. (320) 398-2211 For after-hours emergencies, call one of the area churches. Civil War digest: This week 150 years ago Church .40bit. Thursday, January 3, 2013 Centr Minn. at Fort Lawrence, Beaver Station, Mo., as part of the raid by Confeder- ate Brigadier General John S. Mar- maduke. Major Highlights for the Week Wednesday, Dec. 31, 1862 BATTLE OF STONE'S RIVER, TENN., BEGINS The Confederates at Murfrees- boro, Tenn. waited for an assault from Major General William S. Rosecrans Federal army hut it did not come on the 30th. General Brax- ton Bragg took the initiative imme- diately after dawn when Lieutenant General William J. Hardee's Con- federate corps opened fire on the Federal's right flank. Rosecrans's army held for several assaults on their northern flank, but were pushed back to the Murfreesboro- Nashville Pike and pinned with their backs against Stone's River. Assaults continued until late after- noon and the armies rested as the December evening fell early upon the battlefield. In Washington, President Abra- ham Lincoln met with his Cabinet to make final adjustments to the Emancipation Proclamation. Lin- coln also approved an act admit- ting West Virginia into the Union as the 35th state and signed an agree- ment with a promoter for a colony of free Negroes on Ile a Vache, Haiti. Thursday, Jan. 1, 1863 EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION "I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free." Thus read the final Eman- cipation Proclamation of Jan. 1, putting into effect President Abra- ham Lincoln's preliminary procla- mation of Sept. 22, 1862. No slaves were freed specifically at that moment as the proclamation spec- ified that it applied to "the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States." How- ever, it paved the way for the sub- sequent passage of the Thirteenth Amendment which was passed on Jan. 31, 1865, and ratified nearly a year later. At Murfreesboro, Tenn., it was a quiet day as both armies rested, tended to their wounded ar!d cele- brated New Year's Day. Friday, Jan. 2, 1863 BATTLE OF STONE'S RIVER CONTINUES Late in the afternoon, General Braxton Bragg ordered Major Gen- eral John C. Breckinridge's Con- federates to attack Colonel Samuel Beatty's Federal division which was on a hill on the river's east bank. Breckinridge initially protested but eventually relented to the attack. The attack was initially success- ful until the 45-guns of Captain John Mendenhall's Federal artil- lery opened up on the Confederates and causing more than 1,800 Con- federate casualties in the course of one hour, including many of the 1st Kentucky Brigade, which received it's perpetual nickname as the : Amenities to meet you r needs: .,.::. v:: . . Ar .- 3 meals per day& snacks as,o,JlqLae a're . Scheduled exercise and activities Church activities, including mass 3 timeslmo. -  Housekeeplngllaund servces Medication services with LPN/RN services available 24 hours per day For m House of Kimball Assisted Living at its Finest 50 A British steamer was seized off Mobile, Ala., by the blockaders, one of the numerous captures by the day-in, day-out blockade of the Confederate coast. Confederates captured a North- ern riverboat, Jacob Musselman, MINNESOTA near Memphis. -----i Where Minnesota Regiments were the week of Dec. 31, 1862-Jan. 6, 1861 CIVIL WAR 1.865 1863 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infan- "Orphan Brigade" after Breckin- try- In camp near Falmouth, Va. ridge rode through its ranks crying 2nd Minnesota Volunteer Infan- out, "My poor Orphans! My poor orphans." Bragg's Confederates lost try - On guard duty at Gallatin, 1,294 killed, 7,945 wounded and Tenn., until Jan. 29, 1863. 3rd Minnesota Volunteer Infan- 2,500 missing for a combined loss of try - On duty at Fort Snelling, 11,739 from approximately 35,000 engaged. Rosecrans's Federals lost Minn., until Jan. 16, 1863. 4th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- 1,677 killed, 7,543 wounded and 3,686 missing for a loss of12,906 out try - Duty at White's Station and of 41,400 engaged. Memphis, Tenn., until Feb. 24, 1863. 5th Minnesota Volunteer Salutes, celebrations and meet- ings followed the Emancipation Infantry - Companies B, C and Proclamation in many Northern D remained in Minnesota and cities. In Richmond, the New Year Dakota Territory on garrison duty. The remaining companies were on greeted people with high prices and Major General Ulysses Grant's Cen- more belt tightening. Saturday, Jan. 3, 1863 tral Mississippi Campaign until The Federals pushed two bri: January1863. 6th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- gades forward at Murfreesboro in try- On garrison duty at Fort Snel- a mild attack on Southern lines at Stone's River. During the night, ling, Glencoe, Forest City and General Braxton Bragg's Confeder- Kingston until February 1863. 7th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- ate Army of the Tennessee, despite try - On garrison duty in Mankato apparent victory in the first stages and other points in Minnesota until of the battle, withdrew from Mur- freesboro towards Tullahoma, June 1863. Tenn. 8th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- Confederates failed in an attack try - On frontier duty at various on Moorefield, W.V.; and there was points in Minnesota: Anoka, Princ- skirmishing at Burnsvitle, Miss.; eton, Monticello, Kingston, Manan- Somerville and Cox's Hill, Tenn. nah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Sunday, Jan. 4, 1863 Center, Pomme de Terre, Alexan- dria and Fort Abercrombie until On the Mississippi River, Major May 1864. General John A. McClernand, with 9th Minnesota Volunteer Infan- the Federal Army of the Missis- try - On garrison duty in various sippi, began an unauthorized move frontier Minnesota communities up the Arkansas River with 30,000 until June 1863. troops and 50 transports and gun- boats towards Fort Hindman. 10th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry - Regiment on detached Skirmishing occurred at Mur- service for garrison duty at vari- freesboro and on the Manches- ter Pike as General Braxton Bragg ous outposts in frontier Minnesota continued his withdrawal to Tulla- until June 1863. homa, Tenn. 1st Regiment Minnesota Cavalry Monday, Jan. 5, 1863 "Mounted Rangers" - Organized at Federal troops entered Mur- St. Cloud, St. Peter and Fort Snel- freesboro, although fighting on a ling for frontier duty against Indi- minor scale continued at Lytle's ansuntilJune 1863. Creek, on the Manchester Pike, and Brackett's Battalion of Minne- on the Shelbyville Pike, Tenn. Presi- sota Cavalry- On expedition at Fort dent Lincoln tendered the thanks of Heiman, Tenn. 1st Minnesota Light Artillery the country to Major General Wil- Battery- On Major General Ulysses liam Rosecrans for his victory at Grant's Central Mississippi Cam- Stone's River. In Richmond, Confederate Pres- paign near Vicksburg, Miss., until ident Jefferson Davis told a crowd January 1863. 2nd Independent Battery, Min- that the Confederacy was the last nesota Light Artillery - On duty hope "for the perpetuation of that at Nashville, Tenn., until Dec. 26, system of government which our 1862. forefathers founded- the asylum of the oppressed and the home of true 2nd United States Sharpshoot- representative liberty." ers, Company A - In camp at Fal- Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1863 mouth, Va. It was a day of light fighting along Linn Creek in Missouri; and St. John's Prep hosts Discovery Day Families interested in learn- lunch at approximately 12:30. For ing about the innovative curric- the Upper School (for incoming ulum, and other opportunities at grades 9-12), Discovery Day guests St. John's Prep, are encouraged to are invited to spend the entire day attend the upcoming Discovery in classes. Day on Friday, Jan. 11. Students Registration for Discovery Day currently in grades 5-11 are wel- is required. Call us today at 320- come to attend classes, meet the 363-3321. Due to limited space, teachers and students, and expe- we encourage interested families rience what it's like to be a part of to apply now for the 2013-14 aca- the Saint John's Prep community, demic year. Parents are also invited to attend Founded in 1857, St. John's Prep information session with admin- is a Catholic/Benedictine, co-ed, istrators of the school, private day and boarding school, Guest students arrive before 8 providing students of all faiths in am and are matched with a "host" grades 6-12, with a college-prepa- student for the day. The Mid- ratorycurriculum. For moreinfor- die School (for incoming grades marion, visit www.sjprep.net, or 6-8) Discovery Day ends after ca11(320)363-3321.