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Kimball, Minnesota
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June 9, 2011     Tri-County News
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June 9, 2011
 

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Pa00e 6 Myrna Anderson, 67 Myrna Anderson, formerly of Richmond and Kimball, died Fri- day, June 3, 2011, at her Warroad, Minn., home. She was 67. Memorial services will be held at Our Savior's Lutheran Church in Grygla, Minn. at a date to be deter- mined later. Myrna Elaine Anderson was born Dec. 17, 1943, to Albert and Gena Mootz in Grygla. She mar- ried Darrel Anderson July 3, 1965. Myrna and Darrel lived in Brooklyn Park, then moved to Richmond, then to Kimball where they had a hobby farm. In 1984, Myrna and Darrel moved to War- road where they lived until their retirement in 2005. After retire- ment, Myrna and Darrel lived in Warroad in the summer and they spent their winters in Florida. Myrna enjoyed traveling, cook- ing for her family, corresponding with many friends and relatives, and gardening. Myrna was preceded in death by her parents, sister Beverly Leach, and nephew Steven Leach. She is strvived by her husband Darrel; children Darrin (and De), Dana, Danny (and Stephanie), and Malinda Anderson O'Connor; sisters Bernice (and Donald) Len- hart, Mac Clausen; brother Den- nis Mootz; grandchildren Tay- lor, Austin, Micaela, Hunter, Nico- las, Nathan, and Seen; and many nieces and nephews. Kimball Auxiliary meeting June 13 The Frederick A. Metcalf Unit 261 Auxiliary meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, June 13. This will be our last meeting until September. Cindy May Public Relations Chairman Benefit for Jeanette Weis Jeanette (Blondie) Weis was diagnosed with a stage IV glioblas- tome brain tumor on May 13. It is growing between her vocaliza- tion/interpretation region and her motor strip on the left side of her brain. It has affected her speech, writing, walking, and her thought process. We have opened a bene- fit account to help her family cover extensive bills incurred from her very recent life-threatening battle with cancer. Her Caring Bridge site is www. caringbridge.org/visit/jeanetteweis. Please mail financial contri- butions to: Central MN FCU, 201 Minnie Street, Paynesville, MN 56362, Payable to: Jeanette Weis, Account # 91957. United Way baby shower June 21 United iNay of Central Minne- sota is hosting a community-wide baby shower. Donations will be given to New Beginnings, Anna Marie's Alliance and LSS Crisis Nursery. Tuesday, June 21, the longest day of the year and first day of summer, has been chosen for the event. It is from 1 to 7 p.m. in the New Beginnings Parking Lot (for drive-thru drop off). Location is 40 25th Ave. North, St. Cloud MN 56303. The items needed are larger- sized diapers, formula and baby food. The monthly expens e for dia- pers is about $80 for each child. For a mother at New Beginnings that is 20 percent of her monthly income on diapers alone. United Way is asking compa- nies, organizations and individu- als to run baby drives during June and deliver them during the baby shower. For more information, visit www.unitedwayhelps.org, or call Mary at (320) 223-7991. Catholic Charities Senior Dining June is Dairy Month Catholic Charities Senior Din- ing of Kimball is holding a special "June is Dairy Month" on Thurs- day, June 16, at St. Anne's Catholic Church, beginning at 11 a.m. The events of the day include early coffee, home-made butter samples, and door prizes. The following special menu will be served: Cheeseburger on a bun with flied onions, cheesy vegetable chowder with crackers, flesh water- melon, dinner roll, and ice cream. Senior Dining offers a nutritious meal in a warm and caring atmo- sphere with friendship and fun for persons 60 years of age and over. Join usI Call 398-2211 for more information. I ............. Funeral Care  JH,, ,,,,,H, i ,, Burial and Cremation Services View obituaries, guestbooks and videos on-line Kimball (320) 398-5055 Kimball Area Emergency " Food Shelf, t,' " Inc. St. Anne's Church in Kimball i 10 - 10:45 a.m. Tues./Thurs Also open 2nd Monday of the month: 5:30-6:30 p.m. tel. (320) 398-2211 For after-hours emergencies, call one of the area churches. Church Obit. Thursday' June 9' 2011 r Tn'-County News *Kimball, MN ................ jr::  ,,, . , %% Summer reading programs begin June 13 Great River Regional Library which program they would like to completed with five hours of read- (GRRL) will begin its annual Summer Reading Program (SRP) for children and teens ages 0-18 on Monday, June 13, continu- ing through Aug. 13. Registration takes place at all 32 GRRL loca- tions beginning June 13. The goal of the SRP is to encour- age reading and to keep young readers reading during the sum- mer months. Various studies have shown that: Reading over the summer prevents summer loss of reading skills. Summer loss of reading skills is cumulative. Children do not catch up in the fall because the other children are moving ahead with their skills. By the end of sixth-grade, children who lose reading skills over the summer can be two years behind their classmates. Children who enroll in library summer reading programs main- tain or improve their reading skills more than those who do not. Self-selection of reading materials is an important factor in motivating struggling readers and is a key component for most sum- mer library programs. Each GRRL location will offer summer programs aimed at three different age groups, 0 to 3, 3 to 12, and grades 6 to 12. Three-year-olds and 11 to 14-year-olds may choose be in. Children under 3 must do the Read-to-Me program. Partici- pants may be-only in one SRP. Note: Visiting and vacation- ing children who do not live in the GRRL area are welcome to par- ticipate in the SRP. All books and reading materials count for the program, even materials that do not belong to the library. The pro- grams are: "One World, Many Stories - Read to Me" for children from 0-3 The 0-3 program for babies and toddlers prepares children for con- tinued success through the devel- opment of early language skills. It's a program designed to help kids develop the first and essential building blocks to literacy such as letter knowledge and vocab- ulary. Parents receive a Read-to- Me reading record to complete for their children. The completed and signed reading record can be returned to the library for a prize drawing for parents who engage their children in early literacy skills. nOne World, Many Stories" for children ages 3 - Grade 6 The age 3 through sixth-grade program provides children with an incentive to continue reading throughout the summer. Partici- pants receive reading record slips on which they record every hour they read. When a slip has been ing, it may be turned in and the child can begin another. Children are encouraged to complete and turn in as many reading records as they want. Each completed read- ing record may be turned in for a chance to win local incentive drawings and regional grand prize drawings. "You Are Here" for teens in grades 6-12 The teen program asks teens to track their reading in 30-min- ute segments which they mark on coupon sheets they then enter for local and regional incentive drawings. Reading books, maga- zines, graphic novels and newspa- pers counts for this program. Each coupon sheet covers four hours of reading. Participants may turn in multiple completed sheets. Programming Many library events are hap- pening at all GRRL locations to celebrate the program all summer long! Exciting programs are being funded with money from Min- nesota's Arts and Cultural Heri- tage Funds, such as performances by GREAT Theatre, creative craft programs from ArtStart, ventrilo- quism classes, and mosaics work- shops. Check out the Events page at www.griver.org for dates and times and to pre-register for some events, or speak with staff at your local library. Pit orchestra auditions for 'The Sound of Music' Dassel-Cokato Community Theatre is posting a pit orchestra audition call for its summer musi- cal production of "The Sound of Music." Auditions are scheduled for 7-8:30 p.m. "Thursday, June 9, in the Dassel-Cokato High School Band Room. Enter the PAC (Per- forming Arts Center) entrance and follow signs to the Band Room. Rehearsals will begin mid- June. Performance dates are at 7 p.m. July 21, 22, and 30, and July 31, at2 p.m. Orchestra requirements: piano, flute 1 and 2, oboe, clarinet 1 and 2, bassoon, French horn 1, 2 and 3, trumpet 1, 2 and 3, trombone 1 and 2, tuba, percussion, guitar, violin 1 and 2, viola, cello and bass. Audition preparation: Bring an excerpt from a song to play and be prepared to sight read from "The Sound of Music." Please also bring your summer conflict schedule (vacations,.weddings, etc.) Questions: If you have ques- tions, or cannot attend but are interested in a part, please call Production Assistant Deborah Moen at (612) 236-5137 or Col- leen Compton at Dassel-Cokato Community Education at (320) 286-4120. This production is co- sponsored by Dassel-Cokato Com- munity Education and the Dassel- Cokato Arts Association. Pillow cleaning coming to Kimball Legion Carlson's Pillow Cleaning Service Friday, June 17, 7 a.m. to noon A good goose feather pillow, considered the Cadillac of pillows, given proper care, should last any- where between 60 and 100 years, and still be in good usable condi- tion. Here's why most of them don't: Every time a pillow is washed or steam-cleaned, those feathers have lost bnetween 10 and 15 years of their usefulness. Why? A feather depends on the oil in it for its life and soft- ness. Washing or steam-cleaning removes oil from them, shortening their useable life. Now, if you can get the pillow cleaned and covered in a new tick (material) reasonablylgriced, doing so without removing any oil from the feathers, it is-possible to have a pillow that would last you many, many years. This is where Carlson's Pillow Cleaning Service comes in. They have a machine that can do just that, and do it very reasonably. The machine is mounted in a mobile unit and the work is completed on- site while you wait, same-day ser- vice. This machine system will clean, disinfect, and deodorize the feath- ers without removing any of their oil. Your feathers are not mixed with any other customer's feathers, you receive all of your own feathers back, no feathers lost. How the machine works: The feathers are emptied into the machine where they are rambled and fluffed by rotating brushes. The tumbling action has two additional purposes: to remove the chaff and dust to a grate in the bot- tom of the drum and to subject all feathers to the germ-killing ultra- violet rays produced by powerful germicidal bulbs set into the top ot the drum. After a period of four minutes, the feathers are automatically vacuumed from the drum into a deodorizing chamber, processing through into the new feather and down-proof fabric ticking. The result is a cleaner-than-new pillow, in five minutes. -- Care Amenities to meet your needs: 3 meals per day.& snacks Scheduled exercise and activities Church activities, including mass 3 times/mo. Housekeeping/laundry services Medication services with LPN/FIN services available 24 hours per day House of Kimball Assisted Living at its Finest on: Jo' www.dingmannfuneral.com